advertisement
advertisement

Parkland shooting, one year later: Where are the survivors now?

Parkland shooting, one year later: Where are the survivors now?
Parkland activists Alex Wind, Cameron Kasky, Jaclyn Corin, David Hogg, and Emma Gonzalez attend the 2018 Time 100 Gala at Jazz at Lincoln Center on April 24, 2018 in New York City. [Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Time]

On Valentine’s Day last year, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, turned into a nightmare. A shooter armed with a semiautomatic rifle walked into the school and killed 14 students and three faculty members. In the wake of that horrifying tragedy, students Jaclyn Corin, Emma González, David Hogg, Cameron Kasky, and Alex Wind have dedicated themselves to preventing it from happening to anyone else.

Still reeling from the shooting, the five teenagers helped form what became the #NeverAgain movement, a grassroots effort that inspired one of the largest student protests in history, drawing more than 1.2 million people across the country for the March for Our Lives rally. Since then, the five activists, who were included on Fast Company’s Most Creative People list last year, haven’t stopped working for stricter gun regulations, advocating for change, urging young people to register to vote, and fighting for what they believe in.

With the tragic first anniversary of the shooting here, we look at what the survivors are doing now:

  • Jaclyn Corin. Just six days after the shooting, Corin helped organize a bus trip to the state capital of Tallahassee to demand tighter gun regulations. Along with Sarah Chadwick, Delaney Tarr, and Cameron Kasky, she founded March for Our Lives and Road for Change. She also launched a social media campaign, centered around the hashtag #WhatIf, aimed at ending gun violence, and has continued to advocate for change via social media. Corin will graduate in the spring and tweeted that she will attend Harvard University in the fall.
  • Emma González. In the wake of the tragedy, Gonzalez delivered a fiery speech that immediately thrust her into fame. She used her newfound platform to push for change, helping to lead March for Our Lives, speaking across the country on the “Road to Change” tour, which registered young voters, and speaking out for gun control on Twitter and at rallies around the country. She now attends New College of Florida.
  • David Hogg. After leading March for Our Lives and taking part in the “Road to Change” tour, Hogg and his younger sister, Lauren, wrote a book about the shooting, #NeverAgain: A New Generation Draws the Line. He has remained an active advocate for youth activism and gun control, frequently clashing with the NRA and conservative pundits. He is attending Harvard in the fall.
  • Cameron Kasky. Within 24 hours of the shooting, Kasky’s hashtags #NeverAgain and #EnoughIsEnough went viral. While Kasky has since left March for Our Lives, the organization he helped found, he is still active in the fight to stop gun violence. He helped raise funds for the families of Eli Clayton and Taylor Robertson, who were killed during a Madden NFL video game tournament in Jacksonville, and sent messages of support for Parkland parent Ryan Petty in his campaign for Broward County school board.
  • Alex Wind. One of the first activists to speak out against President Donald Trump after the shooting, Wind helped cofound the #NeverAgain gun control movement, as well as the advocacy group March For Our Lives. He recently joined other students in a book cowritten by the March for Our Lives founders called Glimmer of Hope: How Tragedy Sparked a Movement.
advertisement
advertisement