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VaynerMedia exec says the Instagram egg is worth “at least $10M”

VaynerMedia exec says the Instagram egg is worth “at least $10M”
[Photo: Bence Balla-Schottner/Unsplash]

Remember the viral Instagram egg? I’ll be honest with you: My memory had to be jogged. It was that random Instagram account that sprang up out of nowhere and successfully got a picture of a plain old egg to receive the most likes the social media platform had ever seen, beating out Kylie Jenner.

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At the time it seemed like one of those rare but enjoyable occurrences of spontaneous online fun. Sadly, that’s no longer the case because, of course, the egg is now being monetized. That’s just how things work in this day and age, folks.

The Atlantic’s Taylor Lorenz just wrote about the marketers champing at the bit to work with the egg. You see, following its initial post of… well… an egg, there have been subsequent posts of… well… also an egg. But with each new post there’s a bigger crack, leading viewers to believe a “reveal” is in our midst. Meanwhile, its follower count has been rising. Lorenz reports that the viral marketing company Jerry Media–a business that both promoted the Fyre Festival as well as was made on the back of a meme factory known for stealing others’ content–is in the process of trying to sell the egg’s reveal to the highest bidder. Jerry reportedly reached out to some candidates; it’s unclear if anyone’s signed on yet.

This all seems exceptionally stupid… because, well, it is exceptionally stupid. An ephemeral Instagram account is trying to cash in on its 15 minutes of fame, despite the fact that the moment has probably passed.

Marketers, however, are taking the bait. Nik Sharma, the head of DTC at VaynerMedia, told The Atlantic, “being the first brand to crack out of the egg is worth at least $10 million.” He went on to say that businesses, in fact, should “spend on the egg instead of the Super Bowl.” Read that again, because that’s a quote a supposedly human being made about a picture of an egg!

If you ask me, Sharma’s doesn’t seem like the solidest advice–but, hey, I’m not a marketer. While, yes, perhaps the egg reveal could be an online moment, it’s more likely to be a huge letdown. What people liked about the egg was that it was fun and random and one-off. They weren’t signing on for an extended branded event. Yet people like him believe the egg to be a golden opportunity for… something. Well, branding, actually.

How you measure the ROI of a branded egg is beyond me, but VaynerMedia and others are sure on the case. All the same, congrats to the egg account, which I guess stands to receive $10 million…

You can read the full Atlantic article here. 

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