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Goop, new to London, is already being reported to U.K. regulators

Goop, new to London, is already being reported to U.K. regulators
[Photo: Flickr user Phillip Pessar]

Gwyneth Paltrow’s infamous new age-y, female-centric wellness company is being investigated by U.K. advertising watchdogs.

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A charity has reportedly filed claims with both Britain’s National Trading Standards and the Advertising Standards Authority alleging that Goop violated over 113 advertising laws. The charity that filed the reports, Good Thinking Society, says that Goop repeatedly promotes “potentially dangerous” information to its customers.

Goop is known to make big, albeit questionable, claims about the items it sells. Lest we forget the company’s rose quartz vaginal stone, which promised insanely specific health benefits when it was just a rock that women could put into their private parts. Goop agreed to pay $145,000 in a recent settlement over the marketing for that product.

Now people are looking into other claims the company has made. For example, according to the complaint, one supplement Goop sells targets pregnant women and claims to have 110% of the daily amount of Vitamin A they are supposed to get. Some health organizations, however, point out that pregnant women should avoid taking supplements with Vitamin A. (Update: Goop disputes this claim; see the statement below.)

Goop has been trying to enter into the U.K. market. It launched a pop-up store in London as well as a European website. This move from the watchdogs indicates that some Europeans may not be so interested in Goop-ing.

I reached out to Goop for comment and will update this post if I hear back.

Update: Goop has provided me with this statement, from Dr. Susan Beck, Goop’s SVP of science & research:

When used as recommended, goop’s the Mother Load supplements are safe during pregnancy. The Mother Load contains a very moderate 450 mcg (1500 IU) of vitamin A (preformed vitamin A as retinyl palmitate), which is less than the recommended daily intake of 600 mcg per day (per NHS).

The 4000 IU beta-carotene included in Mother Load is only converted in the body to vitamin A as needed, and there is no safety concern for eating this, as there would be no safety concern for eating a large number of carrots containing beta-carotene. The Mother Load package contains a warning that pregnant women should not consume more than 10,000 IU vitamin A daily due to risk of birth defects.

To provide you with more context – All pregnant women need vitamin A. The concern is that pregnant women not consume excessive vitamin A, a key tenet of good nutrition—moderation is the best policy. Per the NHS (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamins-and-minerals/vitamin-a/) the recommendation is that pregnant women not eat liver or pate during pregnancy because of the very high levels of vitamin A it contains, and they recommend being careful not to consume supplements with high levels of vitamin A.


The headline of this post has been updated to reflect that Goop has not been contacted by regulators as of yet.

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