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Ostrichpillow, the bizarre viral napping pod, now has a less dorky design

The creators of the Ostrichpillow Hood claim that using it will help you focus, isolate yourself, or just be comfy in the fall and winter, depending on how you wear it.

Ostrichpillow, the bizarre viral napping pod, now has a less dorky design
[Photo: courtesy Studio Banana]

If you have ever found yourself in the middle of a coffee shop, annoyed by inane conversations, keyboard hardbangers, and noisy eaters, then perhaps the Ostrichpillow Hood is for you.

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[Photo: courtesy Studio Banana]

Or perhaps you are in your apartment trying to relax while your partner is practicing for an audition or your kids are running around screaming like banshees and you think it is way too early to start drinking J&B straight from the bottle. Then perhaps you should back Ostrichpillow Hood in Kickstarter (although it’s never too early to drink J&B straight from the bottle #Protip).

[Photo: courtesy Studio Banana]
Or maybe this winter you will like to go out without wearing a hat or a scarf. That’s okay too, because the Ostrichpillow Hood can fit that function as well (J&B too, just saying).

[Photo: courtesy Studio Banana]

Those are the three functions that its inventors have envisioned for their self-proclaimed “shape-shifting” garment piece: focus mode, isolation mode, and fashion accessory mode.

If you are still not clear about what the hell an Ostrichpillow Hood is: According to its designers, it is a personal shelter made of fabric—a “cocoon that allows you to create your own space for well-being, improving focus and concentration, providing temporary disconnection, or enabling casual freestyle.” It’s a $29 fabric tube made of 27% cotton, 71% polyester, and 2% spandex, and it looks like a hoodie without the part that covers your torso and arms. Or the hood of a medieval monk.

This is not the first Ostrichgarment the designers—the Madrid-based company Kawamura-Ganjavia—have created to isolate ourselves from the constant bombardment of stimuli in today’s public spaces or even at home, surrounded by screens in every room. The original Ostrichpillow and the Junior version were successful, and so was the Ostrichpillow Light. This hood model, however, is a subtler design–classier and less voluminous than its predecessors.

Now, noisy people in coffee shops and I have a long history of total hatred—as in me hating them so much that I wish I had a flamethrower. So maybe, just maybe, I should try the Ostrichpillow Hood to keep my blood pressure low the next time I’m surrounded by coffee slurping fiends who don’t know how to type in their computers without slamming the keys or chew croissants with their mouths fully open.

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It doesn’t seem like a bad idea at all. Except perhaps by wearing it I may end hating myself even more than I hate them.

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About the author

Jesus Diaz founded the new Sploid for Gawker Media after seven years working at Gizmodo, where he helmed the lost-in-a-bar iPhone 4 story. He's a creative director, screenwriter, and producer at The Magic Sauce and a contributing writer at Fast Company.

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