advertisement
advertisement

Google image search is now a design tool

Picular analyzes the top Google image search results to suggest colors that relate to any topic you search for.

Google image search is now a design tool
[Image: Future Memories]

A new design tool called Picular is built around an unlikely data source: Google image search.

advertisement

Picular is a new color search tool that lets you enter any search term and presents you with a slew of options, basing all of its color choices on what pops up first in Google image search. It’s a color-picker, courtesy of internet hive mind.

[Image: Future Memories]

For instance, if you type the word “desert” into Picular’s search bar, the tool scrapes the top 20 image results from Google and finds the most dominant color in each image. It presents these results in a series of tiles: A sea of sandy browns and oranges, with a few blues (presumably from the sky) thrown in. Each tile has the color’s RGB code that instantly copies to your clipboard when you click on the tile, making it easy to instantly try out the colors in your work.

[Image: Future Memories]

Picular is a quick and handy way to get color ideas for a design project, especially because you can type in more emotional, evocative words and see what Google instantly associates with each idea. “Peace” conjures a bunch of cool colors, like grays and blues, with a couple brighter colors in the mix. “Dreamy” is almost entirely blues and purples, while “desire” returns warm reds and browns. “Dynamic” has an eclectic jumble of blue, yellow, and red.

[Image: Future Memories]

The tool is the brainchild of the Sweden-based digital design studio Future Memories, which now uses the tool on a daily basis. According to the studio, about 15,000 other creatives frequently use the tool to test whether search terms are strongly related to particular colors. Of course, it still requires a designer’s eye and aesthetic to make any final decisions, but Picular serves as a crowd-sourced answer to which colors a certain topic corresponds with.

You can check out the tool here.

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Katharine Schwab is an associate editor based in New York who covers technology, design, and culture. Email her at kschwab@fastcompany.com and sign up for her newsletter here: https://tinyletter.com/schwabability

More