advertisement
advertisement

There will be no R–rated features on Disney’s new streaming site

There will be no R–rated features on Disney’s new streaming site
[Photo: HenningE/Pixabay]

Ever since news broke that Disney was ditching Netflix and heading out on its own, media watchers have been eager for details about what a Disney streaming service might look like. Turns out it might be squeaky clean.

The New York Times got a few more details about the Mouse House’s forthcoming streaming site, which people have dubbed DisneyFlix in the absence of a real name. According to the Times, the new site (whatever its name ends up being) will try to rake in a profit in a crowded market by targeting families so specifically that there will be no R-rated movies on the platform.

Since that family-friendly content may not be enough to differentiate the site from Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Video, and every other up-and-coming streaming service out there, Disney is also reportedly hoping to make only “quality” content. Ricky Strauss, the former Disney film-marketing chief who is helming the streaming site, told the Times that “quality is going to be critical” for Disney. (That may have been a subtle dig at Netflix, which seems to taking a spaghetti-at-the-wall approach to making content.)

Of course, unlike Netflix, Disney’s site has heavyweight creators in the family—Disney, Pixar, Lucasfilm, and Marvel are already making content for the service. And future features include Jon Favreau’s $100-million “Star Wars” series, Timmy Failure, which will bring the middle-school-grade graphic novel to the screen, as well as live-action remakes of Lady and the Tramp and The Sword in the Stone. Not to mention, the hotly anticipated ( . . . by someone?) remake of Three Men and a Baby.

Disney has also supposedly tried to buy back rights to old “Star Wars” films from Turner Broadcasting, Bloomberg reported last week. Thanks to Disney’s acquisition of Fox, it can also add programming from National Geographic, and possibly family films such as Home Alone and Ice Age—although that decision is reportedly still TBD. But Fox’s less family-friendly fare, such as The Simpsons, will reportedly stay on Fox’s Hulu—a safe distance from children’s eyes.

advertisement
advertisement