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Lunar eclipse live stream: How to watch the July 2018 “blood moon” online

Lunar eclipse live stream: How to watch the July 2018 “blood moon” online
[Photo: Flickr user nickliv]

The longest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century will take place for roughly four hours today, July 27, with the peak eclipse happening at 4:21 p.m. EDT, according to EarthSky.org.

The totality, which, you may recall, is when the Earth’s shadow covers the moon and casts the world into darkness, will last one hour and 43 minutes. Unfortunately, if you live in North America you won’t be able to see it outside. You’ll have to stay inside (where it’s safe) and instead watch it online.

This lunar eclipse is not only the longest of the century, but it will also be a so-called blood moon, a phenomenon that earns its name due to a reddish hue that, according to NASA, comes from the Earth’s sunlight being reflected onto the moon. It should not be considered an invitation to satanic sex rituals of humans or horses.

The eclipse will be visible from most places around the world, including Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. Time put together a list of the best places to see the eclipse.

North American residents suffering from eclipse FOMO will be able to watch the event online. Here are a few options:

  • Slooh will broadcast the entire lunar eclipse on its YouTube channel, which should go live at 1:00 p.m. EDT (17:00 UT). It will also have astronomers on hand to offer commentary on the history and science of lunar eclipses on Facebook Live.
  • The Weather Channel will host a live stream on its app beginning at 4 p.m. EDT on July 27 so people can watch on their phones.
  • The Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands will also live stream the event from its observatory here.
  • The Virtual Telescope Project is hosting the alluringly named “Night of the Red Moon and the Red Planet” and will have its cameras trained on the moon during the eclipse. The webcast should kick off at 2:30 p.m. EDT (18:30 UT).

If that doesn’t resolve your FOMO, be patient: North Americans will be able to view a lunar eclipse of their own on January 21, 2019.

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