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Uber whistleblower Susan Fowler Rigetti is the newest New York Times hire

Uber whistleblower Susan Fowler Rigetti is the newest New York Times hire
[Photo: Haxorjoe/Wikimedia Commons]

The New York Times has announced a new hire to its opinion section roster: Susan Fowler Rigetti.

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Fowler Rigetti is the former Uber employee whose viral blog post about the company’s terrible work culture set off a chain reaction of events that ultimately resulted in founder Travis Kalanick stepping down. Since her blog published, Fowler Rigetti’s professional status transitioned from technology worker to high-profile industry critic.

It’s a smart hire for the Times, as Fowler Rigetti can offer readers a perspective on the world of tech that few journalists can. According to the announcement, Fowler Rigetti will write and commission technology-adjacent pieces for the opinion section.

This hire comes almost six months after the paper announced another technology-focused writer was planning to join its opinion section: Quinn Norton–who has written extensively about Anonymous, the Occupy movement, and other underground online communities. However, Norton was a controversial choice. She has covered the unsavory parts of the internet and has been known to make offensive remarks that aligned with the hyper-libertarian ideologies of many of her subjects. After the Norton news broke, many people pointed to some very questionable past posts and tweets, of which the newspaper was seemingly unaware. After the backlash, the company decided to not hire her.

This latest hire will likely not be met with the same avalanche of criticism. Fowler Rigetti offers a refreshing perspective on multiple fronts, given her time within the technology industry, as well as being a woman in the male-dominated Silicon Valley workplace. She has already spent the last two years highlighting the cultural missteps in tech.

Fowler Riggeti will start at the newspaper in September. Let’s hope her new role will lead to the downfall of more bad business leaders.

Correction: An earlier version of this article misstated Fowler Riggeti’s start month at the Times. We regret the error. 

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