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The Interfaces Aboard the New Starship Enterprise

OOOii designed the (fictional) interfaces in Star Trek and Minority Report. Here’s a 360-degree tour of their latest work

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One of the most important and charismatic characters in the new Star Trek movie by JJ Abrams didn’t have any lines at all: In almost every scene, gorgeous user interfaces frame the action, serving the main characters and pushing a precise vision of what the future of computer interaction will be.

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OOOii was the company tasked with producing that vision, and they recently posted a 360-degree tour of the Enterprise bridge that they designed. Screen cap:

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You’ve seen their work before: They were the firm that designed the interfaces in Minority Report, which among interaction designers has become both a bible and a touchstone. Will the new Enterprise bridge win such influence? Maybe, but maybe not for one reason: The design principles behind it are actually now a working goal for a slew of interaction designers, aiming to create “augmented realities” and ubiquitous computing. As OOOii explains:

Production Designer Scott Chambliss wanted us to design thetechnology into an environment where all surfaces were prospectiveinteraction points and the technology was truly ubiquitous across theentire bridge. In order to achieve this free formmovement of data that both Scott and JJ envisioned, we had to design anarchitecture that utilized many computers, dynamic content renderingand broadcasted meta data to create what appears to be a contiguousworld into which all of the screens act as windows.

Sexy stuff. But it’s worth noting that sci-fi, and the technology it depicts, is increasingly near at hand and easier to envision just five or ten years down the road. Take a look at the work in 360-degrees.

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About the author

Cliff was director of product innovation at Fast Company, founding editor of Co.Design, and former design editor at both Fast Company and Wired.

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