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Pure Sleeze: Web sites That Make Fraud Easy

Services that provide your cheating heart all the phony documentation it desires.

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Alibi Network

The next time an employee or a loved one offers proof of their whereabouts or their spending, you might want to think twice: There’s a slew of Web sites that offer all kinds of phony documentation, to help cheat on taxes, expense reports, or spouses.

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As GOOD reports, Customreceipts advertises itself as a “player’s dream come true,” allowing people to order fake receipts that make your bank account look like it’s bulging with cash. The Fake Receipt generator creates just that, so that anyone can pad their expenses. Alibi Network, meanwhile, creates custom tailored excuses–such as a call purporting to be a “work emergency” so that the customer can abscond with the mistress. Corrupted Files sells bogus word files “guaranteed not to open on a Mac or PC” which allow one to claim to have cleared a deadline. These sorts of services have long been available in Japan, where they are known as “alibi-ya,” but are only now becoming more widespread in the U.S.

Does the existence of services like these affect how businesses are running themselves? In other words, are sites like these making life difficult for the rest of us squares who continue to play by the rules? How could you even fight back against them, without wasting lots of time and energy to catch a fraudster? Anyone out there have a story of this stuff in action?

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About the author

Cliff was director of product innovation at Fast Company, founding editor of Co.Design, and former design editor at both Fast Company and Wired.

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