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Cycling Snobs and Lit Snobs Agree: Huzzah for The New Yorker Bike Jerseys!

Retro, a company that makes cycling apparel, has announced their newest product: A pair of jerseys emblazoned with covers from The New Yorker.

The men’s jersey design comes from a 1929 cover by by Theodore G. Haupt, depicting a bicycle race with a heavy Art Deco gloss. The women’s jersey is a newer design, drawn by Ana Juan for a 2008 cover. According to the press release, it depicts “a femininity both delicate and strong.”

Leaving aside how weird these things look, who’s this for? The New Yorker is one of the world’s great publications. And serious cycling has partly been co-opted by high-brow weekend warriors capable of laying out $7,000 for a bike. So we suppose the mash up makes sense–if you’re afraid that your bike only speaks to how much money you make, you could take solace in thinking, “But I read The New Yorker. And everyone knows it.” So tune up the bike, load-up the iPod with some atonal jazz, pack some brie and compote into a picnic basket–and have a blast, good sir! (In terms of ideal customer: Frasier comes to mind.)

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Retro, for it’s part, has armed itself with some strange art choices: They’ve already secured licenses for Smokey the Bear, The Grinch, The Scream, and Rosie the Riveter. The New Yorker jerseys will be on sale in June.

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