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Inside the Lego-plex: No Wonder They Hatch Such Great Ideas

Lego is one of the world’s most creative companies. What kind of office is equal to the task of housing its development staff? Here’s a peek inside the company’s work space, designed by Bosch & Fjord. It’s clever enough, with mildly wacky touches that recall dotcom offices, circa 1999. But there is a strong, overarching design principle at work: Notice how many meeting spaces there are. That’s intentional, but it’s also a move backed by sociology.

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Lego is one of the world’s most creative companies. What kind of office is equal to the task of housing its development staff? Here’s a peek inside the company’s work space, designed by Bosch & Fjord. It’s clever enough, with mildly wacky touches that recall dotcom offices, circa 1999. But there is a strong, overarching design principle at work: Notice how many meeting spaces there are. That’s intentional, but it’s also a move backed by sociology. Studies have estimated that the majority of innovations within a company come from passing social contacts–people shooting the breeze at the water cooler, or shouting over the tops of their cubicles. To that end, a slew of office-furniture companies, from Vitra to Herman Miller to Steelcase, have been creating products that give offices the feel of a living room, from open lounges to cubicles nested in little clusters, to encourage chatting. The Lego development offices offer a clear example of the trend.

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[Via ArchDaily

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About the author

Cliff was director of product innovation at Fast Company, founding editor of Co.Design, and former design editor at both Fast Company and Wired.

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