advertisement
advertisement

Capital Gazette shooting: Obsessive, grudge-filled Twitter account finally gets pulled

As of early this morning, the account was still visible, with Twitter users meticulously going through his tweets and posting screenshots.

Capital Gazette shooting: Obsessive, grudge-filled Twitter account finally gets pulled
[Photo: LoboStudioHamburg/Pixabay]
advertisement
advertisement
advertisement

More than 13 hours after a gunman killed five people at the Capital newspaper in Annapolis, Maryland, Twitter has suspended the apparent account of the suspect, Jarrod W. Ramos, who tweeted in explicit detail about his grudges against the newspaper, its journalists, and the local judges who ruled against his attempts at legal retribution.

advertisement

As of early this morning, the account was still visible, with Twitter users meticulously going through his tweets and posting screenshots. However, Twitter cut off access a short while ago. The company typically does not discuss why it suspends individual accounts, although it’s a bit surprising that it took this long.

In a Twitter stream dating back more than five years, antagonistic tweets were routinely directed at the main Capital Gazette account and the account of some of its journalists, in particular, Eric Hartley, a columnist who wrote about a court case involving Ramos in 2011. In it, Hartley described how Ramos stalked a former high school classmate on Facebook before ultimately pleading guilty to harassment. Ramos went on to sue the newspaper and Hartley for defamation, but his case was ultimately tossed. Hartley now works for the Virginian-Pilot.

The Twitter stream also showed Ramos appeared to be obsessed with his own internet presence, and would make references to how his name, or the name of Hartley’s article, would appear in Google’s autocomplete results when he made different search queries.

advertisement
advertisement

According to the Washington Post, Ramos, 38, has been charged with five counts of murder.

Despite the horror that unfolded in their newsroom yesterday, journalists at the Capital newspaper still put out an issue this morning, with a front page covering the attack and honoring the victims.

About the author

Christopher Zara is a senior staff news editor for Fast Company and obsessed with media, technology, business, culture, and theater. Before coming to FastCo News, he was a deputy editor at International Business Times, a theater critic for Newsweek, and managing editor of Show Business magazine

More