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Of course Jack Dorsey published Notes screenshots to Twitter

Of course Jack Dorsey published Notes screenshots to Twitter
[Animation: kreatikar/Pixabay]

What is the future of Twitter, you may ask? And the answer is: I don’t know! The social network has been under fire for what seems like ever. First, the platform helped the rise of trolls during the GamerGate saga. From there, the company seemed to refuse to crack down on abuse of minorities and women. During the election, misinformation was rampant on Twitter. And now the company says it’s trying to move forward, all the while kowtowing to conservatives who (wrongly) claim the platform has a left-wing slant.

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People have continuously asked Twitter–and its CEO Jack Dorsey–to simply explain what it’s doing to make the social network a better and safer place for its users. The biggest change it enacted late last year was increasing an individual tweet’s post count from 140 to 280, because why not. It also unveiled new ad transparency rules today, which is a step in the right direction.

Also today Dorsey took to Twitter to explain the internal path forward to both the world and his employees, and he required many more characters.

So what did Dorsey do? He published a series of tweets describing the company’s internal reorganization–using screenshots from the Notes app on his iPhone. Yes, Dorsey is telegraphing to the world his $34 billion company’s plan forward, the way Amy Schumer apologized for being racist in 2016.

“I’ve been reflecting on a few things,” Dorsey begins in his Notes app dictation. He then dives into how he believes the company is once again functional and goes on to describe the new company structure . . . again, all via a series of Notes screenshots. He concludes the two-tweet-storm that contains seven screenshots by saying he’s going to have a Periscope with the team later today. I can only hope that during that meeting Dorsey uses doodles from his Moleskine held up to the camera in lieu of a PowerPoint presentation.

Overall, this just shows how bizarre it is that the CEO of a leading technology company thought the best way to deliver important company news was by doing the bare minimum. This move is similar to when the CEO announced–also via a screenshot–that the company was thinking of upping the character count to 10,000. This didn’t happen, but it sure got people talking. People are likely talking again.

Below are the tweets:

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