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An industrial designer’s ode to all the design we throw away

Dina Amin takes trash apart to reveal the marvelous internal life of products.

An industrial designer’s ode to all the design we throw away
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Dina Amin is an industrial designer with a love/hate relationship with her profession. She hates that making products generates so much waste, yet she marvels at their complexity–how every bit fits together in an intricate yet rarely seen puzzle. This dilemma is evident in a series of Amin’s videos that not only reveals how discarded products are made, but how complex seemingly commonplace design can be. In each of the videos, she painstakingly disassembles a trashed product and turns the parts into mesmerizing stop-motion videos. As Core77 reports, she’s made 30 of these little odes to industrial design so far.

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“I love disassembling products to learn more about how they work, how all the pieces come together,” she writes on her site. “It’s like a puzzle to me!” Amin says the project got started through tinkering–in fact, she now has a hashtag, #TinkerFriday–with old parts and rearranging them into characters and stories.

She also points out that we’ve lost our ability to be amazed by human ingenuity. “We rarely see what’s inside each product thus treat it as one whole part; not as a plastic cover, with buttons, vibrator motor, mic and so on,” she writes. “This makes it easier to throw things away, one thing goes to waste, and not many.”

Indeed. After watching her short video unraveling all of the pieces of a seemingly simple lock, it’s hard not to stop and marvel at the human-made stuff that surrounds us.

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Since we don’t care about what goes into making the stuff we consume anymore, Amin’s videos are a little like an education. You’ll never look at your clock the same way again. You can follow Amin on Instagram.

About the author

Jesus Diaz founded the new Sploid for Gawker Media after seven years working at Gizmodo, where he helmed the lost-in-a-bar iPhone 4 story. He's a creative director, screenwriter, and producer at The Magic Sauce and a contributing writer at Fast Company.

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