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First Look: Copenhagen’s New Power Plant Doubles As A Ski Hill

The Italian photographer Aldo Amoretti is in the middle of a photography project that aims to document the newest architectural landmarks that are transforming cities in northern Europe. That includes Bjarke Ingels Group‘s Amager Resource Center: The long-planned waste recycling and power station in Copenhagen that will double as a ski hill when it’s complete.

[Photo: Aldo Amoretti]
The new power plant–which turns solid waste into electricity through incineration–has been online since March 2017. But now, construction is almost complete on its biggest attraction: A 170,000-square-foot park that offers hiking trails, fitness stations, a climbing wall, and a 1,650-foot-long ski slope during the winter. At the top of this monumental structure, nicknamed Copenhill, visitors will be able to enjoy amazing views of the Danish capital, one of the most livable cities in the world.

[Photo: Aldo Amoretti]
Aldo tells me over email that he tried to portray this building and its relationship with the city and the environment. “[I]t has become a primary element of the city,” he says, “and not just a technical-industrial building of waste recycling into energy.” An estimated 57,000 people will use the ski slope every year. Around it, there are also other recreational areas, like a cable park for wake-boarding and soccer fields. BIG’s plant aims to integrate industrial infrastructure into the social fabric of the city. Though a report from the Danish publication Murmur argued the community doesn’t produce enough trash to justify its cost, Bloomberg reports that the plant’s new technology aims to help Copenhagen reach long-term carbon goals and become a boon for tourism and education.

You can follow Aldo’s photographic journey here. Next up? Shooting work by architects like Reiulf Ramstad, Johansen Skovsted Arkitekter, and Joseph Lluis Mateo in the coming months.

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