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Westinghouse Announces Refreshed Line of LCD TVs

At an event in New York City today, Westinghouse (OTC: TOSBF) announced the availability of its refreshed set of LCD televisions, previously debuted at CES in January. The new displays almost unanimously sport what the company calls a “piano black” aesthetic: dark, glossy screen bezels with clear plastic trim and low-profile buttons along the screen’s side. The TX series boasts the company’s high-end offerings, which are all 1080p and come in 42, 47 and 52-inch sizes.

At an event in New York City today, Westinghouse (OTC: TOSBF) announced the availability of its refreshed set of LCD televisions, previously debuted at CES in January. The new displays almost unanimously sport what the company calls a “piano black” aesthetic: dark, glossy screen bezels with clear plastic trim and low-profile buttons along the screen’s side. The TX series boasts the company’s high-end offerings, which are all 1080p and come in 42, 47 and 52-inch sizes. The cheapest of the bunch, the 42-inch at $1099, has a little brother: the 40-inch VK-40F580D, which is identical in price, but includes a DVD player slickly tucked below the screen. Why no Blu-Ray? Company reps said the regressive licensing fees on Blu-Ray technology would have made a combo LCD/Blu-Ray player too expensive for consumer taste. That was also their answer to notable absence of any TVs with a 120Hz refresh rate; while other companies have stepped up to the plate to introduce 120Hz TVs, Westinghouse maintains that customers aren’t interested in the $200+ price jump that the technology would require.

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Scaling up from the $1099 pricepoint, Westinghouse has estimated street prices for the 47-inch and 52-inch at about $1600 and $2000, respectively. The company’s 720p selections, that are offered in SK, PT and W series, are available in various sizes between 16 and 32 inches. Interestingly, company reps told FastCompany.com that the models in their product line receiving the most attention were the modestly-priced (and sized) 32-inchers of the SK series, which retail for about $750 (or $850 with built-in DVD player). The reason is anybody’s guess; higher fuel costs, a stagnating economy, or a surfeit of houses that already have a primary big-screen television. In any case, Westinghouse seems to have their specs right and their prices at bargain level; whether the TVs perform commensurately remains to be seen.

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About the author

I've written about innovation, design, and technology for Fast Company since 2007. I was the co-founding editor of FastCoLabs

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