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Selling “Sex and the City”

Sure Sex and the City has become a cultural phenomenon regarding relationships and the challenges 30-something women face. But let’s get real — this film is all about the money.

Sure Sex and the City has become a cultural phenomenon regarding relationships and the challenges 30-something women face. But let’s get real — this film is all about the money.

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And money it has certainly delivered. According to Variety, the New Line Cinema film raked in $55.7 million in opening weekend ticket sales (the film’s budget was only $65 million), proving that a film with a predominately female audience can rule the box office. Not only did it break every box office record for an R-rated comedy, it is the strongest opening ever for a film headlined by a female lead. Furthermore, it proved that a female-led comedy could hold its own with summer action blockbusters, traditionally geared towards male audiences.

SATC is for sure a product placement goldmine (Hello, Manhattan Mini-Storage boxes!), and designer label commercial all in itself (how many women will be buying — or copying — Vivienne Westwood wedding gowns this year?) Additionally, the film has spawned a number of New York City tourist attractions, including a bus tour of show sites, such as Carrie’s famous Upper East Side apartment stoop and Magnolia Bakery. The show has also laid the groundwork for the four ladies to start their own businesses, such as Sarah Jessica Parker’s fragrances and her (very successful) discount clothing line, Bitten. Today, Kristin Davis announced that she will jump on the celebrity clothing brand bandwagon in partnership with the North Carolina-based company, Belk, Inc.

Based on opening weekend numbers alone, it would be worth it to most studios to start talking sequel by now. But a bigger question: will it be worth it to the fans? The reviews have been mixed from both fans and critics alike, and a sequel could potentially alienate some fans. In a radio interview with Ryan Seacrest on May 27, Parker said that there was no talk of a sequel — nor does the film necessarily leave room for one. It’s quite wrapped up into a nice little package like one of the episodes of the six-season show. The film has wrapped up the essential questions that left most viewers hanging when the show concluded in 2004. Now that all of the characters are out of the thirties, and the biggest storyline of the show has been finally wrapped up (trying to avoid spoilers here, fans), it is questionable where writer and director Michael Patrick King could take the story next.

But if Indiana Jones can make a comeback with a less-than-satisfying additional adventure years after his prime, so can the four heroines of Sex and the City.

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