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Dell Leaks Notebook Product Roadmap

The Boy Genius Report has received a copy of Dell’s [NASDAQ: DELL] product roadmap for its portable computers, and while there aren’t any huge surprises, there are some note-worthy inclusions. A salient one is a new model Dell is calling the Latitude XT2 tablet, which is a successor to the company’s existing XT tablet line. While it’s clear from the leaked documents that Dell doesn’t have the XT2’s specifications fully vetted, the new notebook will sport a 12.1-inch WXGA display and Intel Montevina (aka Centrino 2) chip architecture.

The Boy Genius Report has received a copy of Dell’s [NASDAQ: DELL] product roadmap for its portable computers, and while there aren’t any huge surprises, there are some note-worthy inclusions. A salient one is a new model Dell is calling the Latitude XT2 tablet, which is a successor to the company’s existing XT tablet line. While it’s clear from the leaked documents that Dell doesn’t have the XT2’s specifications fully vetted, the new notebook will sport a 12.1-inch WXGA display and Intel Montevina (aka Centrino 2) chip architecture. Other specs are somewhat speculative; the document lists the presence of an optical drive as “under investigation,” and calls the machine’s 3.5lb weight a “target weight.” Other features will include UMA graphics for Windows Vista Aero, the standard array of ports, ExpressCard 34 and SDHC interfaces, and other fun gadgets like a built-to-order option for a fingerprint security reader. The XT2 will be available in November.

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Another new model slated for future production is the semi-rugged E6400 ATG tablet, which will sport a 14.1-inch LCD as well as dust and humidity-resistant casing. Accident-prone customers will be pleased to learn that the ATG will also feature a shock-mounted hard disk and a spill-proof keyboard; all standard fare for the rugged category. That notebook will be available this June.

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About the author

I've written about innovation, design, and technology for Fast Company since 2007. I was the co-founding editor of FastCoLabs

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