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Masters of Design 2006

Idea Log: The Logic of Design

  • <p>Wai Lam Wong is an Australia-trained industrial designer at a Malaysian R&D firm. In his spare time, he develops concepts that could improve life for people with disabilities, posting his ideas on his blog, Woogle Works. He lives in Kuala Lumpur.</p>
  • <p>Left: the shaped "legs" were a prominent feature through the final design. Right: the initial sketches included a removable backrest that would also function as a backpack.</p>
  • <p>The form matured into the shape of a seated human figure. The structure would be made of plastic layered with upholstery--a hard external shell with a soft, warm interior.</p>
  • <p>The <strong>Bigfoot Wheelchair</strong> is an experimental design intended to show that someone with a walking disability can enjoy the luxury of a cool wheelchair in the same way I enjoy my pair of Nikes. I tried to show that it could function as a natural extension of the body, rather than a chaos of clanging metal.</p>
  • <p>The Bunny idea uses a series of mechanical gears to drive a clamp that opens the bottle. It is triggered by pressing on the top with the palm; the button springs back and is pressed repeatedly until the bottle cap comes free.</p>
  • <p>The ears engage a flip switch: Turning them to the right or left determines whether the cap is being opened or closed.</p>
  • <p>My right hand is weak from an injury, and I conceived this tool to help people like me open and close bottles single-handedly. The <strong>Bottle Bunny</strong> concept is chrome-plated, reflective. Thermoplastic elastomer molded over ABS plastic would give it a softer touch and surer grip.</p>
  • <p>This is the first sketch. The image of a foot is already visible--a cartoonish look on the far left, a more conventional one in the center. The sketch on the right explored the possibility of using a hinged extension to produce the rocking motion.</p>
  • <p>The <strong>Rocking Crutch</strong> was designed to eliminate the jarring "stumping" motion of traditional crutches. The curved sole would provide a larger contact area without hindering movement. Elastomer dampers would absorb shock and improve comfort, with lightweight plastics and aluminum tubing used throughout.</p>
  • 01 /09

    Wai Lam Wong is an Australia-trained industrial designer at a Malaysian R&D firm. In his spare time, he develops concepts that could improve life for people with disabilities, posting his ideas on his blog, Woogle Works. He lives in Kuala Lumpur.

  • 02 /09

    Left: the shaped "legs" were a prominent feature through the final design. Right: the initial sketches included a removable backrest that would also function as a backpack.

  • 03 /09

    The form matured into the shape of a seated human figure. The structure would be made of plastic layered with upholstery--a hard external shell with a soft, warm interior.

  • 04 /09

    The Bigfoot Wheelchair is an experimental design intended to show that someone with a walking disability can enjoy the luxury of a cool wheelchair in the same way I enjoy my pair of Nikes. I tried to show that it could function as a natural extension of the body, rather than a chaos of clanging metal.

  • 05 /09

    The Bunny idea uses a series of mechanical gears to drive a clamp that opens the bottle. It is triggered by pressing on the top with the palm; the button springs back and is pressed repeatedly until the bottle cap comes free.

  • 06 /09

    The ears engage a flip switch: Turning them to the right or left determines whether the cap is being opened or closed.

  • 07 /09

    My right hand is weak from an injury, and I conceived this tool to help people like me open and close bottles single-handedly. The Bottle Bunny concept is chrome-plated, reflective. Thermoplastic elastomer molded over ABS plastic would give it a softer touch and surer grip.

  • 08 /09

    This is the first sketch. The image of a foot is already visible--a cartoonish look on the far left, a more conventional one in the center. The sketch on the right explored the possibility of using a hinged extension to produce the rocking motion.

  • 09 /09

    The Rocking Crutch was designed to eliminate the jarring "stumping" motion of traditional crutches. The curved sole would provide a larger contact area without hindering movement. Elastomer dampers would absorb shock and improve comfort, with lightweight plastics and aluminum tubing used throughout.

Wai Lam Wong is an Australia-trained industrial designer at a Malaysian R&D firm. In his spare time, he develops concepts that could improve life for people with disabilities, posting his ideas on his blog, Woogle Works. He lives in Kuala Lumpur.

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