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Featured in the July/August Issue of Fast Company Magazine

Guerrilla Moviemakers Invade Hollywood, page 62.

Guerrilla Moviemakers Invade Hollywood, page 62.
Hollywood, beware: In the era of digital movies, more and more people can pick up a camera, teach themselves the art of filmmaking for next to nothing, make a commercial-quality flick, and deliver their films directly to theaters in a few minutes, for a fraction of the cost. The process of cutting out the middle-man, while still in its infancy, has the potential to upend the balance of power that has governed the film industry for decades. Fast Company Deputy Editor Will Bourne is available to discuss how the digital wave is reshaping entertainment by giving power to the little people.

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The Rise Of The Aerotropolis, page 76.
As competition shrinks the globe, a worldwide building boom around airports has made them the center of 21st century cities everywhere except, it seems, the United States. In Hong Kong, Bangkok and Dubai, the airport is the new downtown, and American companies are relocating factories, warehouses, and even their employees’ homes to just beyond the runway. Are these cities — examples of the “Aerotropolis” — the key to competitive agility in the flat world? And are Americans willing to live at the airport in the name of globalization? Fast Company Contributor Greg Lindsay is available to discuss the rise of the aerotorpolis and the impact they will have on U.S. businesses’ agility.

EBay Heads East, page 87.
As the Chinese adapt to life online, American consumerism is taking a great leap forward. China’s impact on worldwide retailing is going to be astonishing. As with e-commerce in the U.S., the Internet cuts out the middleman, turning China’s 111-million-and-growing Netizens loose on the planet, each scrabbling for something that will move online – everything from portable plastic baby pools to a huge collection of beaded purses. Fast Company Deputy Editor Will Bourne is available to discuss the next wave of Chinese capitalism and how it will impact American consumerism.

Finding Value in Otherwise Nasty or Unused Resources, page 96.

Many believe the global boom will spawn an eco-friendly new business: mining landfills. A single ton of junked PCs contains more gold than 17 tons of ore. The idea is one of a number of creative approaches that look at environmental problems as holding the seeds of their own solutions. Fast Company Editor in Chief Mark Vamos is available to discuss how the global building boom is driving up metal prices and turning trash into treasure.

The Future of Advertising, page 51.
Toilets that deliver advertising messages? Ads placed on outlets in airports? Parking spaces that tell you about new products? The future of advertising will be about creating unexpected connections to memorable, real-world experiences in ways that bring brands to life. Fast Company Executive Editor Keith Hammonds is available to discuss innovative trends in advertising.

Future Appliances That Will Save The World, page 40.
Sweden is developing a host of appliances that will nag users about the energy they’re consuming and make evident our otherwise invisible energy consumption. Fast Company Executive Editor Keith Hammonds is available to discuss future energy-saving appliances and if these guilt-trippy devices can win favor among Americans, who consume the most energy in the world.

Guerrilla Moviemakers Invade Hollywood, page 62.
Hollywood, beware: In the era of digital movies, more and more people can pick up a camera, teach themselves the art of filmmaking for next to nothing, make a commercial-quality flick, and deliver their films directly to theaters in a few minutes, for a fraction of the cost. The process of cutting out the middle-man, while still in its infancy, has the potential to upend the balance of power that has governed the film industry for decades. Fast Company Deputy Editor Will Bourne is available to discuss how the digital wave is reshaping entertainment by giving power to the little people.

advertisement

The Rise Of The Aerotropolis, page 76.
As competition shrinks the globe, a worldwide building boom around airports has made them the center of 21st century cities everywhere except, it seems, the United States. In Hong Kong, Bangkok and Dubai, the airport is the new downtown, and American companies are relocating factories, warehouses, and even their employees’ homes to just beyond the runway. Are these cities — examples of the “Aerotropolis” — the key to competitive agility in the flat world? And are Americans willing to live at the airport in the name of globalization? Fast Company Contributor Greg Lindsay is available to discuss the rise of the aerotorpolis and the impact they will have on U.S. businesses’ agility.

EBay Heads East, page 87.
As the Chinese adapt to life online, American consumerism is taking a great leap forward. China’s impact on worldwide retailing is going to be astonishing. As with e-commerce in the U.S., the Internet cuts out the middleman, turning China’s 111-million-and-growing Netizens loose on the planet, each scrabbling for something that will move online – everything from portable plastic baby pools to a huge collection of beaded purses. Fast Company Deputy Editor Will Bourne is available to discuss the next wave of Chinese capitalism and how it will impact American consumerism.

Finding Value in Otherwise Nasty or Unused Resources, page 96.

Many believe the global boom will spawn an eco-friendly new business: mining landfills. A single ton of junked PCs contains more gold than 17 tons of ore. The idea is one of a number of creative approaches that look at environmental problems as holding the seeds of their own solutions. Fast Company Editor in Chief Mark Vamos is available to discuss how the global building boom is driving up metal prices and turning trash into treasure.

The Future of Advertising, page 51.
Toilets that deliver advertising messages? Ads placed on outlets in airports? Parking spaces that tell you about new products? The future of advertising will be about creating unexpected connections to memorable, real-world experiences in ways that bring brands to life. Fast Company Executive Editor Keith Hammonds is available to discuss innovative trends in advertising.

Future Appliances That Will Save The World, page 40.
Sweden is developing a host of appliances that will nag users about the energy they’re consuming and make evident our otherwise invisible energy consumption. Fast Company Executive Editor Keith Hammonds is available to discuss future energy-saving appliances and if these guilt-trippy devices can win favor among Americans, who consume the most energy in the world.