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Tech Monday: How Apple Sold A Million iPhones

It’s not rocket science. We learned a valuable lesson from Steve Jobs in recent weeks. If a product isn’t selling so well, and its cost seems to be its main prohibitor — then, slash it’s price significantly.

It’s not rocket science. We learned a valuable lesson from Steve Jobs in recent weeks. If a product isn’t selling so well, and its cost seems to be its main prohibitor — then, slash it’s price significantly. That’s exactly what Apple did, dropped the 8GB iPhone to $399, and gave $100 store credit to the crybabies who were early adopters and originally paid $599 for the device.

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I must confess, initially we didn’t think the iPhone would hold up to its predecessor’s numbers. But by all accounts, it has not only exceeded expectations, but surpassed early sales activity of the original iPod. Go figure.

Of course the slashed prices made a major impact. But we also have to look at the third-party unlock software now out on the market, like iPhoneSimFree and iPhone Worldwide Unlock among others, that enables an iPhone purchaser who doesn’t have AT&T service to swap out the AT&T sims card for their own carrier’s. And while these are the best known in the retail sphere, numerous hacks for unlocking iPhones have been around on the Internets for a while now. Some work, some don’t, and some don’t even survive iPhone software upgrades–which often turn the unlock feature off.

Regardless, the iPhone is experiencing a healthy success. And while Apple may not have become the goliath of desktops and laptops, or even software, it’s proving that handheld entertainment and communications devices is quickly becoming its forte. We’ll just forget about its earlier flop that was the Newton, a personal favorite of mine. Looking back on the device now though, it was ahead of its time and has definitely become the blueprint for all PDAs and Smartphones ever since. And let’s not forget how the company changed the music game either.

Sure, it may be Jobs’ smoke and mirrors to some, but the truth is, the more the company innovates, the more successful it becomes. And the takeaway from that one is — never let your company become a stalemate, otherwise new players will take your position. Apple may have written the book on that one, but it’s also the sort of advice that companies like Google and Amazon hold to their core.

About the author

Lynne d Johnson is a Content + Community Consultant developing content and community strategies that help brands better tell their stories and build better relationships with people toward driving brand awareness, loyalty, and purchase intent. She has been writing about tech and media since the Web 1.0 days, most recently about how the future of consumer interactions will be driven by augmented reality and wearable tech.

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