advertisement
advertisement

Technology: iPhone Exuberance: How Do You Actually Like Yours?

I have been longing for an iPhone since they came out, and this weekend, without the kids in tow, I found myself in an Apple Store with a free half-hour to really try one. Like many first-time users, I was amazed at the graphic wizardry of the touch screen. And although this Apple Store was completely jammed — not a pleasant Apple shopping experience — there were about 20 iPhones on display to play with, and a half-dozen store employees to help you out.

I have been longing for an iPhone since they came out, and this weekend, without the kids in tow, I found myself in an Apple Store with a free half-hour to really try one. Like many first-time users, I was amazed at the graphic wizardry of the touch screen. And although this Apple Store was completely jammed — not a pleasant Apple shopping experience — there were about 20 iPhones on display to play with, and a half-dozen store employees to help you out.

advertisement
advertisement

I don’t have a Treo or a Blackberry, just a regular cell phone. But I was hoping the iPhone would be the solution to the burden of hauling my laptop along on business trips. I take it mostly to do email, and if the iPhone could handle that, I could stop lugging the computer (without giving up the ability to browse the web or watch movies).

As seductive as the iPhone is– smaller and sleeker in your hand than it looks in pictures — typing emails on it was a painful process, worse than hunt-and-peck. It seemed that if you had more than a sentence to compose for an email, using the iPhone would rapidly grow tedious.

So with Steve Jobs slashing the price of the top end iPhone today by 33 percent — from $599 to $399 (boy am I glad I didn’t actually drop $599 on one on Saturday) — how do you actually like your iPhone?

If you’ve got an iPhone, and you’ve got a couple weeks of experience using it for the functions beyond the phone — the mapping tools, movie-watching, Safari, e-mail — drop us a note with the comments section below to tell us what the experience is like.

Is it a practical way to compose email messages? What has your learning curve been like? Which of the non-phone functions have become indispensable, and which are oversold?

advertisement

Let us know.

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Charles Fishman, an award-winning Fast Company contributor, is the author of One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission that Flew Us to the Moon. His exclusive 50-part series, 50 Days to the Moon, will appear here between June 1 and July 20.

More