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Are You Safe on the Web?

There’s ample amount of discussion about the safety of youth on the Web, especially those who set up profiles at MySpace and have become prime targets for predators. But does anyone ever really discuss the safety of adults on the Web?

There’s ample amount of discussion about the safety of youth on the Web, especially those who set up profiles at MySpace and have become prime targets for predators. But does anyone ever really discuss the safety of adults on the Web?

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There’s a recent issue in the blogosphere focusing on the claims of a well-known blogger and developer named Kathy Sierra, who states on her blog that she received death threats on another blog. Sierra goes on to name names, and has filed a police report.

One of the accused, Chris Locke, the author of The Cluetrain Manifesto, and who goes by the name of Rageboy in the blogosphere, has responded to the allegations. On his blog this morning, he posted his response to Sierra’s allegations by publicizing an email interview with Liz Tay from Computerworld Australia. He outright denies any culpability for the attacks on Sierra.

Yet, the public is forming its own opinions and taking action. Robert Scoble, a well-known blogger and videoblogger has taken the week off from blogging in support of Sierra Heath Row, a contributing editor with FastCompany.com, posted a response on his blog referencing the Justice Department’s campaign warning young women of the dangers of being too open online. Another well known personality in the consumer generated media space and co-founder of Audioblog.com, Eric Rice, was also disturbed by this alleged incident. On his blog he discusses the fact that notoriety brings forth criticisms and attacks. But to what extent?

Have bloggers become celebrities to the point where they’re receiving the same kind of blowback that Angelina Jolie receives for adopting babies from other countries, or that Michael Jackson receives for spending too much time with kids? Is this just a blogging issue? Should people fear becoming too public both online and offline, because they might open themselves to attacks? I’m working on answers to these questions, but I don’t have any yet.

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About the author

Lynne d Johnson is a Content + Community Consultant developing content and community strategies that help brands better tell their stories and build better relationships with people toward driving brand awareness, loyalty, and purchase intent. She has been writing about tech and media since the Web 1.0 days, most recently about how the future of consumer interactions will be driven by augmented reality and wearable tech.

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