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Finding the Right IM App for My Smartphone

I own a Tmobile MDA, and I was none too pleased with the OZ IM software that came preinstalled on the device. I upgraded to the MDA from a Sidekick II not too long after its initial release. I wanted the services that I got on the Sidekick, plus the benefits of ActiveSync, for linking with an Exchange Server or files and applications from the desktop. So this meant I was going to need reliable IM services, but that’s not what I got.

I own a Tmobile MDA, and I was none too pleased with the OZ IM software that came preinstalled on the device. I upgraded to the MDA from a Sidekick II not too long after its initial release. I wanted the services that I got on the Sidekick, plus the benefits of ActiveSync, for linking with an Exchange Server or files and applications from the desktop. So this meant I was going to need reliable IM services, but that’s not what I got.

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For one, there were separate logins for AIM, Yahoo! Messenger, and MSN Messenger — and there was no Google Talk. For the legions of us that use such free IM clients as Trillian, Adium, or Fire on our desktops — with the ability to log into all four of these services plus ICQ and any Jabber account simultaneously, maintain a chat history log, and view all conversations in one window — the OZ way is so byzantine.

As well, every time I tried to log into my AIM account, the software would just hang. Well after several emails to Tmobile’s customer service, and conversations with reps on the phone, I found out that there were Yahoo! and AIM issues. Later, I found that one of the AIM issues was OZ’s inability to load a long buddy list. I was informed that I should create a new username for mobile usage. Uh, no, I don’t think so, I’ve had this screen name since the late ’90s. No thanks.

I immediately decided that my situation sucked, and I would be better off going back to my Sidekick. But still, there were functions that the MDA offered that the Sidekick, at least the Sidekick II, did not.

Finally, a friend hipped me to Agile Mobile Messenger, and I tried it while it was in beta. I liked the way it worked, but it kind of slowed my phone down a bit and the program itself would often hang. Then after beta, Agile was going to charge $29.95 for annual usage. So, a couple of weeks ago, I started using something else.

Today, I have a paid subscription for WebMessenger and it’s not so bad. It does almost everything I need it to do. Most of all, everything else on my phone works normally when it’s on. In fact, I’ve only encountered one issue with it so far. There’s no intuitive hyperlinking and phone number detection, but the developers are working on it. Considering the fast response I received from tech support about this today, I’m not too worried about falling out of love with WebMessenger any time soon.

About the author

Lynne d Johnson is a Content + Community Consultant developing content and community strategies that help brands better tell their stories and build better relationships with people toward driving brand awareness, loyalty, and purchase intent. She has been writing about tech and media since the Web 1.0 days, most recently about how the future of consumer interactions will be driven by augmented reality and wearable tech.

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