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What’s Next? Web Lifestyle Television

LX.TV, a new broadband television network, launched yesterday as the first broadband television network for young affluent online consumers. Although LX.TV first appeared in June of this year as CODE.TV, LX.TV now stands for “Lifestyle Television” and is taking the idea of the tech-savvy moneyed user to a new level.

LX.TV, a new broadband television network, launched yesterday as the first broadband television network for young affluent online consumers. Although LX.TV first appeared in June of this year as CODE.TV, LX.TV now stands for “Lifestyle Television” and is taking the idea of the tech-savvy moneyed user to a new level.

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Although the online network provides professionally produced content, the site is little more than a style and entertainment guide for wealthy city dwellers in their 20s and 30s. Available only in Los Angeles and New York, the site treats visitors to information on shopping, nightlife, arts, health, and philanthropy, all broadcast in high definition.

LX.TV further sets itself apart from traditional broadband entertainment by masquerading as an actual television. When visitors log onto the site, a video plays automatically, just like turning on the TV. To change “channels” viewers can shop a number of two-minute previews before they choose what to view. LX.TV will also welcome the first broadband talk show, featuring MTV News correspondent SuChin Pak and interviews with arts and entertainment celebrities.

As one of the Internet’s first broadband channels, LX.TV has a lot to live up to. And with all independently-produced content, it may well exceed expectations. The only question is the viability of the audience. Although Internet TV viewing is up, with 1 in 10 people watching, the target audience for LX.TV is more likely to have bottle service at Marquee than tune in to LX.TV for fashion and society updates.

But high profits in this new media market may keep it a success no matter how many viewers come to the site. Broadband channels eliminate high-cost barriers such as cable carrier or satellite fees, and there are no production studios needed for assembling the content. As long as this medium stays low cost and high profit, an on-demand delivery system can’t be beat. LX.TV has also recruited an industry giant as their first sponsor — Absolut Vodka is rumored to have paid six figures for a six-month sponsorship. The station has also acquired an agreement with NBBC, the syndicated broadband network of NBC, to deliver their content on affiliate networks’ Web sites.

Considering the cult following of Rocketboom the video blog and its recent competitor Wallstrip, a similarly irreverent styled online video show, the content and potential sponsorship for LX.TV bodes well for its success.

What do you think? Is LX.TV destined for widespread success? Or do its creators need to go back to the broadband drawing room?

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