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Blogs: The Other Job Board

Job sites are continually trying to find ways to get in front of passive candidates. Ya’ know, the most desirable prospects who already have a job. Doing so helps job boards become more desirable to employers (their clients). Partnering with sites whose primary reason for existence isn’t job content is typically a pretty effective way to achieve this objective. Historically, the most popular way to do this would be to ‘power’ a career center for an association site, for example. Other targets for job sites to partner with include portal sites, local sites, community sites, etc.

Job sites are continually trying to find ways to get in front of passive candidates. Ya’ know, the most desirable prospects who already have a job. Doing so helps job boards become more desirable to employers (their clients).

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Partnering with sites whose primary reason for existence isn’t job content is typically a pretty effective way to achieve this objective. Historically, the most popular way to do this would be to ‘power’ a career center for an association site, for example. Other targets for job sites to partner with include portal sites, local sites, community sites, etc.

One of the most notable partnerships recently created includes vertical job search engine Simply Hired adding their job content to MySpace. If you’re looking to get your jobs in front of the 16-to-22-year-old demographic, this is probably a great thing.

Now, blogs are “what’s cool” in the quest for the passive job seeker.

Here’s how it works: Popular blog about [fill in topic] allows employers to post jobs on blog to target audience.

Techcrunch, a mega-popular blog destination for techies, recently launched a job section to its site dubbed Crunchboard. The site charges $200 (30 days) for employers to put their opportunities in front of Techcrunch’s highly sought-after readers.

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If my math is correct, the blog has raked in over $20,000 since Aug. 1 in job postings. Not bad. Blogger makes a good living. Employers get in front of the right people at a fair price. Readers access quality job postings that aren’t “Make a million on eBay” in nature. Search engines find and index more of blog’s content, equaling more traffic. Even SEOs get new prospects to target. Everyone wins.

Well, everyone except slowly adapting job sites. You see, as far as I know, Crunchboard isn’t partnered with any job site. It’s all home grown. So, if job sites don’t get on the ball and create a way for popular bloggers to make easy money by plugging in job posting functionality via the job site’s technology, they get no piece of the pie. Savvy job boards will dive into this opportunity head first.

Good money and big opportunity for bloggers via job content. Maybe this blogging thing will take off afterall.