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Step One: Inspiration

When I got Heath’s email about FC’s BlogJam I felt a surge of excitment rush through me, followed immediately by the crushing weight of panic. In this tech-savvy business world, I’m afraid I feel like a bit of an outsider. I spend my days immersed in pictures of, for better or worse, pretty objects. I run a blog that’s focused on uncovering trends and hot new products in the world of home design. You know- pillows, furniture, lighting, the things that make up the lighter side of life.

When I got Heath’s email about FC’s BlogJam I felt a surge of excitment rush through me, followed immediately by the crushing weight of panic. In this tech-savvy business world, I’m afraid I feel like a bit of an outsider. I spend my days immersed in pictures of, for better or worse, pretty objects. I run a blog that’s focused on uncovering trends and hot new products in the world of home design. You know- pillows, furniture, lighting, the things that make up the lighter side of life. So when I saw the guidelines for posts I figured I was screwed- what do I know about business and innovation? That on top of a need for minimal (or no) pictures left me feeling like a fish out of water. So I figured the best way to approach this was go about posting like I always do- examining a design, idea or movement from the bottom up, starting with what inspires a final product.

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I spend a lot of time immersed in inspiration– what inspires someone to create a specific product, use a particular material, turn to a new technology or, in a larger sense, what inspires someone to leave a comfortable 9-5 and pursue a career in design. I think it’s this tiny seed of inspiration that is the key to understanding why people go on to produce innovative products, companies or technologies. The more I talk to independent designers in the field, the more I find myself obsessed with figuring out what inspired them to create, and this trend in examining inspiration seems to be a popular one. When I added podcasts to my site the goal was to talk with indie designers about what inspires them as artists. These podcasts, and subsequent posts on inspiration, have been some of the most popular on my site. In fact, similar sites are now addressing the issue. One of my favorite websites, MoCoLoco has devoted their entire site to interviews about inspiration this week. They’re posting video interviews with movers and shakers in the design field to find out what was behind their biggest and most innovative products. The examination of inspiration often reveals individuals who felt drawn to create a product that didn’t exist in the market, or one that they felt could be improved upon with the use of new technologies or a fresh perspective. What I respond to most about this series (and examining inspiration in general) is the acknowledgement that why people do things can be as interesting as the things themselves. The thread that seems to connect all of these “inspired” people revolves around finding a way to apply new technology and new thought to old ideas. Much like Heather’s post in which everything old is new again, it seems that product designers as well as business professionals are inspired by the idea of reexamining and improving upon the existing market.

Posted by designsponge