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Generational Props

In our November issue, staff writer Lucas Conley offered advice on how to get “I” credit in the politically correct team-oriented corporate culture world of “we” in his piece “Credit Where Credit is Due.” Well, it being one week into the New Year and resolutions weighing on all of our minds, I wanted to do a little of my own credit giving.

In our November issue, staff writer Lucas Conley offered advice on how to get “I” credit in the politically correct team-oriented corporate culture world of “we” in his piece “Credit Where Credit is Due.” Well, it being one week into the New Year and resolutions weighing on all of our minds, I wanted to do a little of my own credit giving.

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As journalists, we depend on the expertise of many, many parties to write a fair, accurate and provocative article. That means relying on many busy people–from corporate types to academics–to take a chunk out of their day to devote to some random reporter on the other line. Of course, should they make it into the piece, it’s a nice little PR plug for them (in the PR world, I believe the equation is “one PR hit is equivalent to the three times the dollar amount of an ad”). But the truth is, because of rigid word counts handed over to us by our editors (and trust me, we don’t like word counts either), the majority of sources never end up making it into the article.

In my January/February piece on Generation Y entering the workforce–“Scenes from the Culture Clash”–I interviewed a number of really smart and insightful authors, academics and “intergenerational consultants” (who knew?) who ended up getting the following credit in the piece: “we spoke to more than a dozen of them [generational experts].” Wow, I’m sure they were thrilled when the issue hit the stands and they realized their hours on the phone with me resulted in that measly reference.

So it’s time for some credit giving to those who didn’t make it into the article:

Eric Chester: author of “Generation Why?”
David Stillman: co-author of “When Generations Collide”
Charlotte Shelton: author of“The NeXt Revolution: What Gen X Women Want at Work and How Their Boomer Bosses Can Help Them Get It”
Jean Walker, aging workforce expert, OI Partners
Dr. Beverly Kaye, CEO of Career Systems International
Claire Schooley, Senior Industry Analyst, Forrester, author of report “Get Ready the Millennials Are Coming!”
Heather Neely, author, “New Leaders: Developing the Next Generation”

If it weren’t for my sources, I wouldn’t look half as smart. Now it’s your turn to give some credit…

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About the author

Danielle Sacks is an award-winning journalist and a former senior writer at Fast Company magazine. She's chronicled some of the most provocative people in business, with seven cover stories that included profiles on J.Crew's Jenna Lyons, Malcolm Gladwell, and Chelsea Clinton

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