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As a Matter of Fat

New York City’s Health Department suggested that restaurants stop using trans fatty oils. They’re believed to be very unhealthy, causing clogged arteries. The Dept. did not ban the ingredient outright, they only urged the eateries to move away from such oils.

New York City’s Health Department suggested that restaurants stop using trans fatty oils. They’re believed to be very unhealthy, causing clogged arteries. The Dept. did not ban the ingredient outright, they only urged the eateries to move away from such oils.

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I find this move strange. The harmful nature of trans-fatty oils have been known for years. It is a clear danger. Yet, the government doesn’t eliminate it altogether. Certain pharmaceuticals are banned, and others are merely forced to carry warning labels. When is the more extreme action of removing something from stores warranted? The government doesn’t allow car companies to use cheap parts with safety flaws. Why should they allow cheap oils with health risks?

It is a delicate situation: Once one thing is banned they might ban another and another. Then restaurants and food businesses, like markets or caterers, may have their wrists tied. Should the Government regulate food so closely? When do regulations begin limiting businesses unreasonably?

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About the author

His work has also been published by Kill Screen, Tom's Guide, Tech Times, MTV Geek, GameSpot, Gamasutra, Laptop Mag, Co.Create, and Co.Labs. Focusing on the creativity and business of gaming, he is always up for a good interview or an intriguing feature.

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