advertisement
advertisement

Late to Work?

It rained early this morning in New York City. Hard. So hard that train tunnels flooded, traffic backed up, trains were rerouted, and practically everyone in the Fast Company office got in late. Some commutes that normally take 45 minutes took two hours. I, myself, was running late, and I breathed a sigh of relief when I saw that my colleagues, too, were behind the times. But I started thinking, I wasn’t going to miss a meeting, there was no real reason I had to be here at the time I was shooting for — why the anxiety over being late to work?

It rained early this morning in New York City. Hard. So hard that train tunnels flooded, traffic backed up, trains were rerouted, and practically everyone in the Fast Company office got in late. Some commutes that normally take 45 minutes took two hours.

advertisement
advertisement

I, myself, was running late, and I breathed a sigh of relief when I saw that my colleagues, too, were behind the times. But I started thinking, I wasn’t going to miss a meeting, there was no real reason I had to be here at the time I was shooting for — why the anxiety over being late to work?

Research in the Journal of Applied Psychology contests that being late to work has nothing to do with demographics — gender, race, age, marital status — and everything to do with psychographics. To whit: If you’re chronically late to work, you have a bad attitude about work. “Employees who are late are also seeking ways to remain away from work,” the study says.

While I’m curious whether it’s really true that people with families are no more or less late to work than singletons, it was good to learn that I wasn’t alone — and that there was a positive cause behind my anxiety. If that’s not true for you, you might find this list of excuses useful.

Update: An FC Now reader emailed me in response indicating that people living and working in Florida faced much greater challenges during Hurricane Frances and its aftermath than New Yorkers did with today’s rain. ‘Tis true; I didn’t intend to compare the two experiences. Here’s how one company affected by the hurricane is coping.

Orlando, Florida-based Channel Intelligence is revisiting its policies and procedures for handling emergencies such as huricanes Charley and Frances — as well as working with employees and partners who are hit hard.

advertisement

Some of the new policies in place for Channel Intelligence employees include:

  • Extended flex-time for workers to deal with issues such as home repairs, health concerns and family relocation efforts
  • Shared resources, such as food, ice and building supplies to help those in greatest need
  • Opening the children’s room at the corporate office in Celebration to children of employees who may be displaced from schools and daycare centers in the aftermath of the storms
  • A relaxation of paid days off (PDO) policies that will allow for extended time to deal with pressing family issues, without cutting into established vacation time for employees

How does your company deal with disaster?

advertisement
advertisement