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Offshore Storm III

FC Now reader Tom Asacker makes an interesting remark in response to an entry yesterday.

Who says it’s primarily large multinationals outsourcing work overseas?

In 1993 I outsourced the production of a $100k tool for an injection molded plastic medical device to a company in Singapore. And my company only employeed 15 people at the time.

Large and small companies have been outsourcing manufacturing work for years. But now it’s hitting the new economy jobs, and thus being blogged about.

Fair enough. Outsourcing — and offshoring — is nothing new. But I’d offer that it’s not that “new economy” jobs are being offshored, but that service economy jobs are being offshored. Similarly, I’d wager that most service jobs are being offshored by larger organizations.

Given Bush’s recent efforts to reclassify fast-food restaurant jobs as manufacturing roles in order to increase the number of existing domestic jobs — which some analysts have criticized because such classification can be misleading, it seems that the service economy in general may be at some point “reclassified” writ large. Is that good for American business?

The Atlantic‘s Jack Beatty recently contextualized such offshoring, and some critics contend that many new jobs created in fact pay less than the jobs that have been lost.

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