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Distraction Fraction… and the Role of RQ

In finishing the book last night, I came across a couple of sections in the “Understand” and “Wellness” chapters that — while resonating strongly with an experience at work just this week — seemingly contradict each other. I don’t write this entry to point out a possible inconsistency in the book but as a way to further explore a concern in my own work life.

In finishing the book last night, I came across a couple of sections in the “Understand” and “Wellness” chapters that — while resonating strongly with an experience at work just this week — seemingly contradict each other. I don’t write this entry to point out a possible inconsistency in the book but as a way to further explore a concern in my own work life.

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In the “Understand” section, Bev and Sharon suggest that people might not be listening enough — to their colleagues, partners, or customers. “I thought it was great ‘multitasking’ to answer my email while people talked to me. Now I realize the message I sent was ‘You’re not important.'” (p. 139)

Then, in the “Wellness” chapter, they offer tips and tactics for managing your time at work — including edging out off-the-cuff conversations with colleagues. “I kept a log of how much time I spent when people wandered into my cubicle — or I wandered into theirs. It added up to a whopping hour a day on average! It’s been tough, but I’ve managed to cut that in half (and still feel like I’m part of the social environment that I love).” (pp. 153-154)

It’s that latter part that challenges me. Why, just the other day, I found myself distracted while talking with my co-worker Alison. I even swiveled around to check in on email — while in mid-sentence! What tips and tactics might Bev, Sharon, and FC Now readers offer in terms of focusing on colleagues… while remaining focused on tasks at hand?

Back to the “Understand” chapter, the “follow the blinking word” NLP-like approach to drilling down to someone’s real meaning struck a particular chord. Bev and Sharon comment on how such practices can help people move from IQ to EQ — which then leads to RQ, or your reputation quotient.

In a recent MarketingProfs column, William Arruda offers three steps for building your RQ:

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  • Extract. Learn what separates you from your peers and is compelling to those who need to know about you so that you can expand your success.
  • Express. Identify the tools that you will use to communicate your unique promise of value so that you will become consistently and constantly visible to those around you.
  • Exude. From your desk or office to your voice-mail greeting, you must ensure that everything that surrounds you sends the same on-brand message.
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