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Survey, Shmurvey!

Grrrrr. I just got off the phone with a client who was describing the vast amount of dollars spent on their yearly employee survey. He told me the that the lowest respondent scores were around feeling challenged at work, feeling that there was good communication with a manager, and feeling that someone cared about the respondent’s career. I asked if those scores were the lowest in last year’s survey. (Yup, you guessed it) And the year before that? (Right again!) When I asked what their next steps would be, he explained that they would take the scores “under advisement”, benchmark “best practices” in other companies, and convene some task forces to work out some plans and submit them to an executive committee. This is precisely what had been done in the past, and still no change. I challenged the client to guess at the dollars that they might spend on all of this thinking and planning, and to actually DO something instead.

I would imagine many of you are frustrated with this kind of thinking. Folks, there does come a time to stop surveying and start DOING, especially when you keep getting back the same answers. This topic is well addressed in this article in HR.com by a colleague, Theresa Welbourne.

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