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Reply to Carl

Carl, you make some great points. Telling your boss what and how you feel and providing relevant information is critical. And, how right you are – it is up to you to let that boss know who you are.

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Carl, you make some great points. Telling your boss what and how you feel and providing relevant information is critical. And, how right you are – it is up to you to let that boss know who you are.

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But here’s my question; how many of us know who we are? I’ve spent a great deal of my professional life (and it continues to this day) working in the career development arena inside of corporations. I think it’s a two-fold issue. First, many managers have no idea how to have a good career discussion with their people, and many individuals don’t know how to initiate one with their manager. To do that well means doing your homework and thinking about what you do want, and what you do offer. (The “Career” chapter in the Love It book has some great questions to get you started in this thinking.)

Every employee has every right to ask for what they want, but far too many have only vague ideas of what that is.

Here’s something anyone out there can try, if you want to have a conversation about something that is vaguely missing, but you can’t put your finger on it.

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Try your hand at figuring out your values. Let us know if it helps to organize that conversation.