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Welcome!

Good Morning! (Clearly, we’re on the West Coast!). Good Afternoon to the East Coast. Sharon and I are pleased to be with you this week to be part of a dialogue about what it takes to love your job, and why loving your job is smart these days.

Good Morning! (Clearly, we’re on the West Coast!). Good Afternoon to the East Coast. Sharon and I are pleased to be with you this week to be part of a dialogue about what it takes to love your job, and why loving your job is smart these days.

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Sharon and I plan to dialogue with one another through the FC blog and also interact with you. Sharon lives in Cambria, (it’s beautiful there) California and I live about three hours south, in the LA area, Sherman Oaks to be exact. We’ll both be entering our blogs during our own workdays (and nights) so, though we may not be able to answer immediately, we’ll do our best!

First, a little intro to the two of us. We met about 6 years ago through a mutual friend who insisted that we needed to connect because we “thought alike”! When we did, we found she was, indeed, right. Although we were both consultants, and approached our work differently, we had a similar passion for helping organizations build more positive workplaces. Sharon approached it from an executive coaching perspective, and I through a career development lens. Together we decided to do the retention and engagement research that led to our first joint book, Love ‘Em or Lose ‘Em: Getting Good People to Stay. That book was directed at managers and insisted that there were a whole host of things they could do to keep the talent on their teams. It wasn’t all about pay! We delivered (with a team of associates) seminars, speeches, and workshops all over the world on that topic, and we continue to do this work today.

The idea for this book was brewing all that time. We heard many managers tell us that they realized there were actions they could take, but wondered why it was all on their shoulders. Shouldn’t the individual be responsible for their own workplace happiness? Why did they continually complain to their managers expecting them to “fix” everything? It took us about two years of research and writing, and many false starts, but we think we have a pretty good list of specific actions for anyone who wants to move the needle on their own workplace satisfaction. That’s what Love It is all about.

So here are a few questions to get you thinking. What DOES love have to do with it? (Tina Turner asked it too!) Does it really matter if we like our jobs? And what does liking or loving your job look like? When was the last time you felt that way about your work?

Anyone?

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