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  • 08.28.03

Beauty Pays

Berkeley business professor Hal Varian reports today that the unthinkable is true: Good-looking people (mainly men) consistently enjoy more professional success than their less physically attractive colleagues. As if that weren’t insult enough to the less-glamorous ranks, the study Varian refers to indicates that more than garden-variety discrimination is at play here; being attractive may actually enable higher productivity.

Berkeley business professor Hal Varian reports today that the unthinkable is true: Good-looking people (mainly men) consistently enjoy more professional success than their less physically attractive colleagues.

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As if that weren’t insult enough to the less-glamorous ranks, the study Varian refers to indicates that more than garden-variety discrimination is at play here; being attractive may actually enable higher productivity.

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