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The Promise of Fast Education

Roger Martin Roger Martin is the dean of the Joseph L. Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. He was appointed to a seven-year term beginning on September 1, 1998.

Roger Martin

Roger Martin is the dean of the Joseph L. Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. He was appointed to a seven-year term beginning on September 1, 1998.

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A Canadian from Wallenstein, Ontario, Martin was a director of Monitor Co., a strategy-consulting firm, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with a global network of offices and activities. He was the founding chairman of Monitor University, the firm’s educational arm. He received his AB from Harvard College with a concentration in economics and his MBA from the Harvard Business School. Currently, he serves as a director on the boards of the Thomson Corp., Celestica Inc., the Ontario SuperBuild Corp., and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto.

Wrote about: The Promise of Fast Education

Is learning: Martin is currently finishing a book on leadership collaboration, is working to create the most innovative collaboration yet between business schools and the venture-capital industry, and is planning for ways to change the way ethics is taught to make it more actionable.

The staff at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management want classroom experiences to be generative, resulting from interactions and real-time exercises between classmates. To that end, they have launched several new courses, including one called “Learning How to Learn,” which focuses almost exclusively on interactive exercises that help students understand and overcome their limits to learning. It’s designed to increase students’ long-term ability not only to be more self-reflective, but also to learn on the job in real time.

Is reading:

Coordinates: martin@mgmt.utoronto.ca

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Thornton May

Thornton May has emerged as a trusted advisor for senior executives seeking to understand the rules, roles, and wrongs of the new economy.

May is the corporate futurist and chief awareness officer of Guardent, a digital-security services firm. He also serves on the faculty of the John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management at UCLA, where he teaches the “Managing the Information Resource” program; of the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, where he teaches the “Inside the IP Tornado: Silicon Valley” and advanced-management programs; and of Carnegie Mellon University, where he is a part of the faculty team that created the e-commerce program.

May is probably best known not for his humorous and scathingly honest speeches or his hands-on and deeply committed approach to organizational problem solving, but for the openness and accessibility of his network. He knows a lot of people who know a whole lot of things.

Wrote about: The Promise of Fast Education

Is learning: May is currently exploring things that go bump in IT, specifically the creation of secure digital infrastructures. He’s also pursuing the role of advisory boards in value creation as well as the dimensions of “digital trust.”

Is reading:

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Coordinates: thornton.may@guardent.com


Christopher Meyer

Christopher Meyer is vice president and director of the Cap Gemini Ernst & Young Center for Business Innovation. The CBI is charged with identifying the issues that will be challenging business in the future and will be defining responses to them. As director, Chris is responsible for establishing the CBI’s research agenda. His own current research interests include the development of a “new theory of the firm,” the implications for management of new discoveries in complexity and self-organizing systems as well as the development of the “connected economy.” Chris is an authority on the evolution of the information economy, the innovative use of information and its impact on strategy, shareholder value, and “informationalization” of the firm. Chris established the Bios Group, Ernst & Young’s initiative to develop complexity-based solutions for management. He has more than 20 years of general management and economic-consulting experience. He coauthored Blur: The Speed of Change in the Connected Economy with Stan Davis.

Wrote about: The Promise of Fast Education

Is learning: Meyer is considering the bio economy, the effect of emotion in business, and the application of complexity science to business.

Is reading:

Coordinates: chris.meyer@us.cgeyc.com

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John Quelch

John Quelch is dean of the London Business School, ranked by the Financial Times as number eight in the world and number one outside the United States two years in a row. He was previously the Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing at Harvard Business School. He is a nonexecutive director of WPP Group PLC and was a founding director of Reebok International Ltd.

Wrote about: The Promise of Fast Education

Is learning: Quelch’s recent challenges include coping with the excess demand for London Business School’s portfolio of six new e-business and new-economy education seminars. He is also researching how to use distance and distributed learning to bring top-quality management education to a broader audience and how consumer packaged-goods companies can revitalize themselves to become, once again, marketing thought leaders.

Is reading:

Coordinates: jquelch@london.edu


Jeffrey F. Rayport

Jeffrey F. Rayport heads Monitor Marketspace Center, a research, media, and consulting unit of Monitor Group, a strategy-services and consulting firm based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. As a member of the Harvard Business School faculty, Rayport developed and taught the first e-commerce course at a top-tier business school in the United States. Established in 1995, his course “Managing Marketspace Businesses” is an HBS elective on Internet-enabled venture strategies that has enrolled more than 1,000 students, produced nearly 100 HBS case studies, and incubated scores of business plans for new-economy startups, including Yahoo! and Zefer. In 1997, 1998, and 1999, Rayport was selected Outstanding Professor by the HBS Student Association. As a consultant, Rayport has advised executives and corporations around the world, focusing on breakthrough service strategies for network-based and digital businesses at high-tech, media, entertainment, and service firms. He has also appeared in a variety of management videos, teleseminars, and online-training products. His board memberships include AGENCY.com, Andrews McMeel Universal, Be Free, ditto.com, edu.com, and Global Sports Interactive.

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Wrote about: The Promise of Fast Education

Is learning: Rayport is working on a textbook and a casebook, coauthored with colleague Bernie Jaworski (formerly of the University of South Carolina’s Marshall School of Business), both entitled E-Commerce. He is also collaborating with Jaworski on a trade book for publication in early 2001, entitled Marketspace.

He is also developing a prime-time television program on thought leaders in the new economy for Report on Business Television (ROB-TV), a business-oriented cable-TV network in Canada, that will premiere in late 2000.

Is reading:

Coordinates: jeffrey@tnbt.com


Alan M. Webber

In 1993, Alan M. Webber cofounded Fast Company, a different kind of business magazine designed to give people the tools they need to succeed in today’s world of work. As the founding editor of Fast Company, Webber is responsible not only for driving, managing, and contributing to the content of the magazine every issue, but also for evolving the publication’s unique character and style.

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Wrote about: The Promise of Fast Education

Is reading:

Coordinates: awebber@fastcompany.com


B. Joseph White

B. Joseph White has been dean of the University of Michigan Business School for a decade. The school has been singled out as “most innovative” among the world’s top business schools. White recently announced that after serving his last year as dean during the 2000 – 2001 academic year, he will do “something different.”

Wrote about: The Promise of Fast Education

Is learning: White is developing a “successful intelligence” test to use in Michigan’s MBA program admissions, a subject that was recently covered in the New York Times. He is also striving to attract more women into the nation’s top MBA programs (they are woefully underrepresented) and is preparing himself for a return to full-time faculty work within this year after a nearly twenty-year detour into the practice of leadership and management.

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Is reading:

Coordinates: bjwhite@bus.umich.edu


Carolyn Woo

Carolyn Woo assumed the deanship of the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame in August 1997. From 1995 to 1997, she served as associate executive vice president of academic affairs at Purdue University and, before that, as director of the professional master’s programs in the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University.

In 1998, Woo was chosen as one of 40 Young Leaders of the Academy by Change magazine, a publication of the American Association for Higher Education. In addition, she has consulted for both large and small corporations, and has taught extensively in executive-education programs. She currently serves on the Board’s of three Fortune 500 companies.

Wrote about: The Promise of Fast Education

Is learning: At Notre Dame, Woo is developing a game plan for major faculty and curriculum initiatives upon the receipt of a $35 million gift from Tom and Kathy Mendoza of Net Apps (Network Applications). She is also considering a major revision of the school’s not-for-profit management Master’s program. In her efforts to balance work and life, she is striving to reform her life so that she can attend the majority of her sons’ school events and can master the Chopin waltzes.

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Is reading:

Coordinates: carolyn.y.woo.5@nd.edu