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A woman sports reporter was sexually harassed at the World Cup. She’s not alone

A woman sports reporter was sexually harassed at the World Cup. She’s not alone

Colombian sports correspondent Julieth Gonzalez Theran was doing her job, reporting on the World Cup for DW Espanol ahead of the Russia-Saudi Arabia soccer match, when a man walked up to her, grabbed her breast, and kissed her cheek. The camera was rolling, though, and because Gonzalez Theran is a professional, she continued her report as the man scampered off. She did not offer a finger-pointing lesson in the definition of assault or even a swift kick to the shin.

As the BBC first reported, the entire incident was captured on video and, with Gonzalez Theran’s consent, has been posted online by her employer, which accurately called it both an “attack” and “blatant harassment.” Gonzalez Theran has been speaking out about it, too. “We do not deserve this treatment,” she said. “We are equally valuable and professional.”

It’s part of a larger pattern of harassment of sports reporters who happen to be female. ESPN reporter Erin Andrews has been harassed by fans, tennis player Maxime Hamou was banned from the French Open after forcibly kissing a female reporter during a live TV interview, and in March, a group of 52 Brazilian reporters launched a campaign showcasing incidents of being kissed and groped by fans and athletes. We can at least all agree that this doesn’t happen to Bob Costas—and it shouldn’t happen to anyone.

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