advertisement
advertisement

Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Salmonella outbreak: 6 things the CDC says you need to know

Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Salmonella outbreak: 6 things the CDC says you need to know
[Photo: Flickr user Karl-Ludwig Poggemann]

Maybe if they were still called Sugar Smacks, this never would have happened.

Kellogg Company has issued a recall of Honey Smacks cereal after the company was contacted by federal agencies over reported illnesses linked to the product. The Battle Creek, Michigan, breakfast brand said the recall affects 15-ounce and 23-ounce box sizes, with a “best if used before” date of June 14, 2018, through June 14, 2019. No other products are affected.

Officials from the Food & Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention contacted Kellogg over reported Salmonella contamination, which can result in serious illnesses and cause sometimes fatal infections among vulnerable populations like children and the elderly.

The CDC has issued an outbreak alert. Here’s what you need to know:

  • 73 people in 31 states were infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Mbandaka linked to Honey Smacks. At least 24 people have been hospitalized as a result. California and states in the Northeast had the highest concentration of reported infections. You can view the full map here.
  • If you have a box of Honey Smacks in your home, check the “best if used before” date at the top of the box. If it says June 14, 2018, through June 14, 2019, do not eat it. Throw it away or return it to the place of purchase for a refund. Here’s how to do that.
  • If you store the cereal in another container, throw the cereal away, and thoroughly wash the container with warm, soapy water before using it again.
  • If you’re a retailer, do not sell or serve Honey Smacks with the “best if used before” date of June 14, 2018, through June 14, 2019.
  • If you believe you’ve gotten sick from Honey Smacks, the CDC is asking you to contact a healthcare provider and report it. This helps the agency keep track of statistics.
  • Symptoms of Salmonella infection include diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. Most people develop signs and symptoms within 12 to 72 hours of exposure.

You can read the CDC’s full outbreak investigation here.

advertisement
advertisement