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Here’s the luxury Singapore hotel where the Trump-Kim meeting will take place

Here’s the luxury Singapore hotel where the Trump-Kim meeting will take place
[Photo: Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images]

President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un are set for a historic summit on Tuesday, June 12. As the site for their meeting, the two leaders have chosen one of Singapore’s most luxurious hotels, the Capella Resort on Sentosa Island, a popular vacation spot off the southern tip of Singapore and home to Universal Studios Singapore.

The five-star luxury hotel has 112 rooms and views of the South China Sea. It also has two presidential suites, so Trump and Kim won’t have to duke it out over who gets the big room. There is plenty of room for private conversations between the world powers. It is believed that Trump and Kim will begin with a two-hour one-on-one session with translators, before an expanded meeting that includes advisers.

As for where Kim will spend the night, he’s opted for the St. Regis Singapore, where it is believed he has checked into the hotel’s $11,500-a-night Presidential Suite. It’s where former Chinese President Hu Jin Tao stayed during the 2009 APEC Summit (and don’t tell Trump, but Hillary Clinton stayed there in 2011, too). Kim can expect things like hand-cut crystal chandeliers, hand-painted chinoiserie silk wallpapers, 600-threadcount bed linens, paintings by Marc Chagall, a baby grand piano, separate living and dining rooms, an office, gym, and, of course, the hotel’s renowned (among rich people) butler service.

While the bathrooms are marble-lined and well-appointed, Kim will not be taking advantage of the facilities, as he reportedly brought his own toilet. The safety precaution seems extreme until you remember that both Nikhita Krushev and Mikhail Gorbachev reportedly unintentionally gave the CIA stool samples during visits to the U.S.

Singapore is reportedly footing the bill for the summit—which will run close to $20 million—and will pay for North Korea’s travel expenses. It’s a price they are willing to pay for peace.

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