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Researchers are DNA testing Loch Ness to identify the monster

Researchers are DNA testing Loch Ness to identify the monster
[Photo: Christopher Rusev/Unsplash]

Or, not identify, as the case may be. University of Otago professor Neil Gemmell is leading an international team of scientists to Loch Ness next month to collect water samples from 300 different places in the loch. They’ll then spend the rest of the year pulling DNA from these water samples to identify the animals that live in the waters, reports Phys.org. Gemmell says that as animals swim through water they shed tiny fragments of their DNA from their skin, feathers, scales, and urine. Once tested, the DNA will identify which animal it comes from.

If there is DNA from an unknown animal, it could suggest that the Loch Ness monster is actually an undiscovered creature. If they pull DNA from a plesiosaur dinosaur, it would fundamentally change our understanding of zoology. Of course, as Gemmell thinks is likely, none of the DNA pulled from the waters could be from dinos or unknown creatures, which wouldn’t necessarily be the final nail in Nessy’s coffin, but would mean there is one less reason to believe there is actually a monster in Loch Ness.

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