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Texas Lt. Gov. blames school doors for shootings; Twitter disagrees

“Had there been one single entrance possibly for every student, maybe he would have been stopped.”

Texas Lt. Gov. blames school doors for shootings; Twitter disagrees
[Photo: Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons]

America has a major gun problem. No space is safe anymore; not church, not a concert venue, and especially, it seems, not school. While the common denominator in many of these mass shootings is an often legally procured AR-15, various elements of the pro-gun contingent always seem to find another scapegoat boogeyman to blame.

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The latest school shooting may have produced the lamest one yet, however.

Following Friday’s tragic shooting at Santa Fe High School, where at least 10 people were killed and another 10 wounded, Texas officials held a press conference. One of them, Texas Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick took this opportunity to suggest that the reason this school shooting happened may have something to do with the school’s design, rather than the young man who brought several firearms to school and started shooting kids.

“There are too many entrances and too many exits to our over 8,000 campuses in Texas,” Patrick said, according to The Daily Beast. “There aren’t enough people to put a guard at every entrance and exit . . . maybe we need to look at limiting the entrance and exits into our schools so that we can have law enforcement looking at the people coming in through one or two entrances.”

At least when people blame school shootings on mental illness, rather than the assault weapon the mentally ill manage to obtain–and it almost always is an assault weapon–at least then, the national conversation can (hypothetically) turn to readily available mental healthcare. In this case, the conversation can only turn to architecture, which is not likely to solve the problem that’s already resulted in at least 22 school shootings so far in 2018.

Judging by the Twitter reaction to Patrick’s suggestion, however, there will not be a nationwide soul-searching over high school layouts. In the immediate aftermath of his statement, prominent voices on Twitter began to relentlessly drag Patrick over the inherent absurdity of his blame game.

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Have a look at some of the more popular examples below.

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Related: Why More Security Won’t Stop School Shootings

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