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This startup wants babies around the globe to have safer skincare

Today, a new baby skincare brand called Evereden hits the market, joining the growing movement to make safer beauty products. While brands like Beautycounter and California Baby focus primarily on the United States, Evereden has global aspirations, hoping to tap into Asian and Australian markets in addition to North America.

The company was founded by Kimberley Ho, who grew up in Asia before attending Stanford and becoming a New York investment banker. Whenever she flew to Malaysia, her friends begged her to haul nontoxic shampoos and soaps back with her, since those products weren’t available there. She decided there was an opportunity to launch an internationally minded baby skincare brand.

Evereden products–including body wash, sunscreen, and diaper cream– are formulated with input from Stanford and Harvard doctors. Ho uses ingredients like aloe leaf juice to soothe skin redness and sunflower seed oil to protect the skin’s barrier. The line is designed to be affordable, with prices ranging from $21 to $27, which is cheaper than luxury brands. The products are now available on the brand’s website, but will soon be available in stores around the globe.

Consumers are beginning to realize how toxic many everyday beauty products are. Formaldehyde, a known neurotoxin, is a common ingredient in shampoo, and phthalates, endocrine disruptors, are used in synthetic fragrances. Last year, Senators Dianne Feinstein and Susan Collins introduced a bill called the Personal Care Product Safety Act. Should it become law, it will strengthen the FDA’s authority to regulate beauty products.

Until that happens, consumers who are concerned about their babies being exposed to harmful toxins must turn to brands that are self-regulating. Evereden will provide parents–particularly outside the U.S.–with another option. “The natural beauty industry is at its infancy,” Ho says. “There’s a lot of opportunity to grow, particularly if you’re thinking globally.”

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