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Delta Air Lines just revealed a serious data breach: Here’s what you should do next

Delta Air Lines just revealed a serious data breach: Here’s what you should do next
[Photo: Eluveitie/Wikimedia Commons]

In what is turning out to be the most maddening corporate trend of the year, Delta Air Lines is jumping on the data-breach bandwagon.

The Atlanta-based airline said yesterday that the third-party company that provides its online chat services has been affected by a “cyber incident.” The third-party company is called [24]7.ai, and Delta says it was notified last week about an incident that occurred between September and October of last year. Crucially, the airline says payment information for Delta clients may have been compromised, but that there’s no reason to believe sensitive information from passports, government IDs, or Delta SkyMiles was affected.

Of course, we’ve been on this flight before, so we know how it ends. In cases of corporate data breaches, the full extent of the compromised data isn’t typically known, or made public, until months after the fact. (Revisit the timelines for Yahoo, Equifax, and Facebook, if you need a refresher.) In the meantime, if you’re a Delta customer, here are a few things you can do:

  • Visit Delta’s dedicated response page: The airline says it will launch a dedicated website, delta.com/response, at noon ET today. It expects to regularly update the page with new information.
  • Check your email/phone for further info: Delta says it will directly contact customers whose data may have been affected. It says customers will not be responsible for any fraudulent charges that may appear as a result of the breach.
  • Monitor your credit card transactions: It’s a good idea to keep a close watch on any credit or debit cards you’ve used to pay for Delta-related services.
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