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Listen to this: Talkhouse lets you in on chats between your favorite artists

Listen to this: Talkhouse lets you in on chats between your favorite artists
[Photos: Flickr users brinsknaps, Daniel Benavides]

If you have ever wanted to eavesdrop on a conversation between Kid Cudi and Paul Reubens (aka Peewee Herman), the Talkhouse podcast is here to help.

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In each episode, musicians, actors, filmmakers, comedians, and even food world luminaries sit down and chat with their peers. The show isn’t merely the audio recording of a mutual admiration society, but a conversation between artists capable of offering each other critical analyses and educated opinions on each other’s craft.

The site has serious music cred—it was created by Partisan Records founders Ian Wheeler and Tim Putnam—and it’s known for its musician-written essays and reviews (it once published a review of Kanye West’s Yeezus by Lou Reed). But for me, it’s the podcast that really shines.

Music fans would enjoy the conversation between The National’s Matt Berninger and Conor Oberst (here); Sleater-Kinney’s Carrie Brownstein and The Roots’ Questlove (here); tUnE-yArDs, aka Merrill Garbus, and Laurie Anderson (here); or hearing how New Order’s Peter Hook and The Smiths’ Andy Rourke carve a pathway between 1980s fame and a successful future (here).

Film buffs will want to hear Black Swan director Darren Aronofsky chat with cinematic auteur Alejandro Jodorowsky (here); action film legend Jackie Chan and Baby Driver director Edgar Wright talk filmmaking (here); Mr. Robot creator Sam Esmail chats with one of his heroes, Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost (here); and Penelope Spheeris talks about the 25th anniversary of Wayne’s World (here). A series of food conversations kicked off with James Beard Award-winning chef Andrew Carmellini and A$AP Ferg coming together for an event at the Sonos store in NYC to discuss where their distinctive crafts intersect and how they develop new ideas.

Ferg recounted a conversation he had had with Frank Ocean, who recently spent over a year living in Japan. “It’s cool to see him taking time off to be a human being,” he told Carmellini. “You have to be human and live in situations to write about them or even create. But people just expect you to be a machine. I’ve been telling my managers… ‘I’m not inspired right now!’ I’ve got to find the inspiration. I’ve got to talk to you!”

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