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Instagram ruled the Women’s Marches on social—and the dudes pitched in, too

The Women’s Marches that took place in cities across the world on Saturday dominated almost every social media platform, but one platform in particular stood out: Instagram. The photo-heavy social media site accounted for 47% of the hashtag mentions related to the marches—far higher than any other platform, according to new data from analytics firm … Continue reading “Instagram ruled the Women’s Marches on social—and the dudes pitched in, too”

Instagram ruled the Women’s Marches on social—and the dudes pitched in, too
[Photo: Roya Ann Miller /Unsplash]

The Women’s Marches that took place in cities across the world on Saturday dominated almost every social media platform, but one platform in particular stood out: Instagram. The photo-heavy social media site accounted for 47% of the hashtag mentions related to the marches—far higher than any other platform, according to new data from analytics firm Digimind. Facebook was next in line with 28% of the mentions, followed by Twitter with 18%.

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Digimind analyzed the most popular Women’s March hashtags between January 16 and January 22, a dataset comprising 72,000 posts. #WomensMarch was the top hashtag, followed by #MeToo, #TimesUp, and #PowertothePolls, according to the data. Instagram’s prowess is understandable given its emphasis on visual posts and the fact that sharing pictures of signs from the marches is becoming a ritual in its own right.

The gender breakdown of the mentions was about even, with women sharing 51% of the posts and men 49%. But men edged out in the top hashtag—#WomensMarch—with 51% of posts mentioning that hashtag shared by men. Meanwhile, the vast majority of posts with that hashtag were in favor of the march, with 72% showing a positive sentiment, 9% showing a negative sentiment, and 19% remaining neutral.

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About the author

Christopher Zara is a senior staff news editor for Fast Company and obsessed with media, technology, business, culture, and theater. Before coming to FastCo News, he was a deputy editor at International Business Times, a theater critic for Newsweek, and managing editor of Show Business magazine

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