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People who watch “The Crown” are different than other Netflix users in two ways

As cord-cutting goes more mainstream, Netflix has been looking for ways to attract more TV watchers who fall outside its typical demographic. For instance, it successfully tapped into Gen-X nostalgia with the ’80s-obsessed Stranger Things. Now it looks like it has another success story on its hands with The Crown. Season two of the British … Continue reading “People who watch “The Crown” are different than other Netflix users in two ways”

People who watch “The Crown” are different than other Netflix users in two ways
[Photo: Robert Viglasky / Netflix]
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As cord-cutting goes more mainstream, Netflix has been looking for ways to attract more TV watchers who fall outside its typical demographic. For instance, it successfully tapped into Gen-X nostalgia with the ’80s-obsessed Stranger Things.

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Now it looks like it has another success story on its hands with The Crown. Season two of the British historical drama dropped earlier this month, and new data from Nielsen reveals that its audience is significantly older and richer than the typical Netflix watcher.

More than 50% of The Crown’s audience is over 50, Nielsen says, calling it a “dramatically different audience profile versus the other Netflix originals we have reported on.” (A BRG report from last year noted that the vast majority of Netflix users are under 35.) Over its first three days of availability, Nielsen also found that 40% of The Crown’s viewers came from households with incomes of over $100,000, which I guess makes it easier to relate to all that royal bling Claire Foy has to wear.

The stats come from Nielsen’s SVOD Content Ratings, a commercial service it launched in October to provide third-party measurement of streaming content.

About the author

Christopher Zara is a senior staff news editor for Fast Company and obsessed with media, technology, business, culture, and theater. Before coming to FastCo News, he was a deputy editor at International Business Times, a theater critic for Newsweek, and managing editor of Show Business magazine

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