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The New iMac Pro Is Really Expensive And Really Worth It: Early Reviewers

The machines, meant for Pro users, are super powerful but can’t be upgraded.

The New iMac Pro Is Really Expensive And Really Worth It: Early Reviewers
[Photo: courtesy of Apple]

After much anticipation, Apple has finally said when the new iMac Pro will be available for sale–this Thursday, December 14. The new machines, which design-wise look just like current iMacs, are meant for Pro users, such as video editors, architects running CAD software, and the like.

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Apple gave the new machines to some of these types of users to try out for a week or so before the launch. Their reviews range from positive to positively ecstatic.

Here’s one from YouTube personality Marques Brownlee:

The really big question around the new machine is whether or not it’s worth investing $5,000 or more in something that absolutely can’t be upgraded. The computers may pack so much horsepower that there won’t be a need for more, at least not for the foreseeable future. But that assumption will be tested widely by people who actually pay for one.

Apple, when it announced the new iMac Pro at its WWDC event in June, said the machine comes in 8-core, 10-core, and 18-core Xeon processor versions. It can be configured with as much as 16 GB of VRAM and 4TB of storage.

One reviewer raved about the new 5K display:

“[T]he iMac Pro is a graphics powerhouse–I continually marveled at how crisp and clean everything was rendered with no apparent overhead or impact on performance,” writes aerospace engineer Craig Hunter. Apple sent Hunter a 10-core iMac Pro with 128GB of memory.

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The new iMac Pro may have been borne out of the growing chorus of Mac users–especially professional ones–who were accusing Apple of ignoring its traditionally faithful Pro users while putting most of its time and money into advancing the highly profitable iPhone line. Users also complained that Apple was emphasizing the design of new computers, but failing to give them enough processing power.

Apple began to fear a major exodus of its Pro users, possibly over to Microsoft, which in 2016 had released an impressive Surface Studio machine aimed at Pro users.

All this led to a statement from the company last April: It had gotten the message loud and clear, and it intended to soup up both the Mac Pro and iMac lines. And so it has.

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