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Heyday wants to replicate Drybar’s success with pop-in facial shops

Heyday wants to replicate Drybar’s success with pop-in facial shops

Call it the Starbucks effect. The coffee chain changed consumer behavior, making premium $5 coffee and tea seem like an everyday luxury. Drybar did something similar with $45 blowouts, while Miniluxe did it with $45 manicures.

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Now, Heyday wants to do the same thing with $60 facials. The two-year-old company–which allows you to pop into stores for a quick customized facial–has already set up four stores across Manhattan. But with an infusion of $3 million in seed funding led by Lerer Hippeau, Heyday is set to expand across the country, starting with Los Angeles.

Adam Ross, Heyday’s founder and CEO, says he was surprised by how little Heyday had to do to convince millennials of the benefits of facials. “They treat it as part of a larger investment in wellness, like a monthly gym membership,” he says. “We don’t make our own products, but use a range of different brands. Our customers like this because it means we are objective about their actual skincare needs.”

Ross says the brand plans to invest heavily in data to create skin profiles for each client, which they will eventually be able to access online.

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